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QuestChat/Forum Practice Session Archive
Date: April 25, 2000

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Tue Apr 25 08:40:13 2000

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 0 - 16:25:02 ]
Thank you for your interest in learning about our NASA QuestChats. At this time no practice sessions are scheduled. However, we invite you to contact Oran Cox if you would like to schedule a practice session, or if you have any questions about NASA QuestChats.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 1 - 16:26:14 ]
You may contact Oran Cox at ocox@mail.arc.nasa.gov. Feel free to browse our QuestChat Information Center, at http://quest.nasa.gov/qchats to familiarize yourself with other components of QuestChats. We look forward to hearing from you!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 2 - 16:30:27 ]
Addendum: You may also submit questions to our chat queue for this chat room. Questions will be posted periodically in the chat room, along with responses from a NASA Quest team member.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 4 - 13:03:02 ]
RE: [CarlottaRoman] What education do you need for this field?
Carlotta, I would say that you need at least have a bachelor's degree to work in a field similar to mine. However, the specific area you specialize in for your degree (e.g., engineering, science, math, etc.) would depend largely on the kind of work you would be doing in your job. In my profile (http://quest.nasa.gov/qchats/ocox), I mention that I received my B.A. in anthropology, but have a lot of background in math and science. I think my diverse educational background serves me well in my job -- it allows me to be more adaptable and interact with people in different career fields. So I would encourage you to learn as much as you can from different areas as you continue your education.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 6 - 13:08:25 ]
RE: [CarlottaRoman] Does any of your space simulations or sessions require testing soil on other planets?
Carlotta, although I don't participate in any of these kinds of simulations, I would imagine the simulations include procedures that would take place if humans were investigating another planet. Our Earth-based simulations would most likely include scenarios that involve collecting and analyzing soil. This would help us determine, among other things, if the equipment for these tasks functioned properly or were in needed to be redesigned in some way.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 8 - 13:11:24 ]
RE: [Ollie] I would like to set up the NASA Astronaut Michael P. Anderson Live Webcast, for my students on March 13th, My concern is the time 4:00 pm EST. Could you give me the correct time of airing in Seattle, Washington ?? Or direct me to someone who will be able to? My E-Mail address www.candies80@hotmail.com Thankyou. Mrs, Ollie Taylor / Bryant Manor Computer Learning Center.
Ollie, the live webcast with Michael P. Anderson will be occurring on Monday, March 13 at 1:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time/4:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. You and your students in the Seattle, Washington area should log on at 1:00 p.m. PST to participate. We look forward to hearing from you!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 10 - 13:26:00 ]
RE: [Kathryn] 1) How does the crew carry out their religious beliefs in space? 2) Are there any psychological effects of being without gravity for a prolonged period of time?
Hi Kathryn, that is an excellent question. My understanding is that NASA tries to schedule missions that do not interfere with religious holidays. However, on occasions in which a mission has been extended and overlapped with a particular religious holiday, I believe crew members have been allowed to exercise their recognition of these days. More information about this topic may be available on the JSC web site, at http://www.jsc.nasa.gov. I've heard that prolonged exposure to microgravity has varying effects on the human body. But I'm not exactly sure to what extent that effects the human psyche. However, like you, I'd be very interested to know more, and NASA will most likely direct more attention to that we continue to focus on humans living in space with the development of the International Space Station. Thanks for you questions!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 12 - 13:28:24 ]
RE: [Monica] Did the Rover detect a magnetic field on Mars?
Monica, I don't recall if the Mars Rover detected a magnetic field while investigating the Martian surface. However, much of the data collected from the Rover should be available on the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory web site, at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 14 - 13:34:37 ]
RE: [ruth] hi, what made you decide to go into this field? what are themath requirements for this field? what if you're like me and aren't a whiz kid at math but want to enter this field? would you recommend this field as exciting and rewarding
Hi Ruth, I've always had an interest in science fiction, and I guess I never quite lost my fascination with space exploration either. So working for NASA was something I desired to do at some point in my life. As far as managing NASA chats, that was rather accidental. In previous years, our group (NASA Quest) offered occasional chats with NASA experts, but without any formal structure or management. My manager felt I had the qualifications for this position, so he asked me to take on the job. "The rest is history..."

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 15 - 13:38:10 ]
RE: [ruth] hi, what made you decide to go into this field? what are themath requirements for this field? what if you're like me and aren't a whiz kid at math but want to enter this field? would you recommend this field as exciting and rewarding
I wouldn't say there are any specific math requirements for my job. However, having such knowledge is important no matter what job you puruse. As I mentioned previously, I belive my math and science background is very valuable, whether my position calls for it or not. So I don't think you can ever have too much knowledge. It's bound to benefit you in some way.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 16 - 13:50:57 ]
RE: [ruth] hi, what made you decide to go into this field? what are themath requirements for this field? what if you're like me and aren't a whiz kid at math but want to enter this field? would you recommend this field as exciting and rewarding
I wasn't a whiz kid in my math and science classes either. But I worked as hard as I could, and tried to retain a good understanding of the concepts I learned. I was very fortunate to be offered a chance to work in a group at NASA where I could use my other skills. I would encourage you to think of a variety of career areas that you would be happy pursuing. I certainly believe my job is exciting and rewarding. But no matter what you choose to do, you should enjoy and feel good about yourself, and always have a sence of accomplishment in your work.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 18 - 13:58:13 ]
RE: [osman] how much do you get paid
Osman, the pay scale for NASA employees and contractors differs slightly with each job title, level of experience, and region of the U.S. However, compensation for my job is adequate for me to live reasonably comfortably (by Bay Area standards) and continue my education in graduate school. But what matters most is enjoying your work. So I strongly suggest pursuing a job that interests you and is meaningful. The "money issue" will take care of itself in due time.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 20 - 09:29:46 ]
RE: [taylor] did you want to be a astronaunt when you were little
Hi Taylor. Actually, I was more interested in flying through space in space ships than becoming an astronaut. Perhaps that was because science fiction was more cool to me at a young age. But as I've grown older, I've certainly had opportunities to learn more about the astronaut corps, and how exciting that could be. Also, with NASA's hopes plans for space and planetary habitation and exploration, I would certainly like to be part of the experience. So if I had a chance to venture into space, I would certainly seize the opportunity. Thanks for your question.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 22 - 09:33:49 ]
RE: [taylor] what is it like over there in space
Well, Taylor, since I haven't been to space, I can't really say what being in space is like. However, you can find out from "real experts" what that is like, by visiting our NASA QuestChat archives. Go to http://quest.nasa.gov/qchats/all-archives and browse our Space Team Online and Women of NASA archives of chats with astronauts and mission specialists. They talk about what their experiences have been like while in space.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 24 - 09:48:13 ]
RE: [taylor] are you going to stay with the space team???
Taylor, I would like to think my job is considered part of NASA's "space team," and that I will be fortunate enough to continue my work for at least a few more years. I'm very happy to be part of a team that brings NASA to so many people. We hope this is something we're able to continue doing for more people over the coming years.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 27 - 09:45:49 ]
RE: [ranju] dear oran, are there any specific requirments for getting into NASA?if there are,what are they,'cause iam a student of tenth grade from india and don't get to know much about these things.
Hi Ranju. I know there are certain requirements, such as U.S. citizenship, that NASA employees (civil servants) must fulfill. However, the requirements to for being a contractor for NASA (like I am) may be different in some areas. You should be able to find some information regarding employment within NASA, as a civil servant or contractor, on the NASA home page. You can visit the NASA home page at http://www.nasa.gov. Good luck, and thanks for your interest!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 29 - 07:59:08 ]
RE: [BobfromFleetBoston] Just testing access - making sure the information gets through to you.
Bob, we've received your test message "loud and clear." If you have any additional questions, contact me at ocox@mail.arc.nasa.gov. Have a good day!


[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 1 - 08:48:57 ]
You may contact Oran Cox at ocox@mail.arc.nasa.gov. Feel free to browse our QuestChat Information Center, at http://quest.nasa.gov/qchats to familiarize yourself with other components of QuestChats.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 2 - 08:49:23 ]
At this time, you may submit questions to our chat queue for this chat room. Questions will be posted periodically in the chat room, along with responses from a NASA Quest team member. We look forward to hearing from you!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 6 - 13:57:09 ]
RE: [ALICIA] HELLO WHAT IS YOU NAME
Hi Alicia. My name is Oran Cox.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 7 - 13:57:18 ]
RE: [Katie] 1. How and when did you decide you wanted to be an astronaut? 2. What is it like in space? 3. Is it scary takeing off into space? 4. What is your favorite part of space? 5. What kind of food do you eat in space?
Hi Katie, I am not an astronaut, although I think being one would certainly be very cool, for sure. So I guess my favorite part of space would be, all of it! As far as learning about the experience of space flight, from liftoff to landing, I encourage you to visit the many NASA Internet sites that offer you a lot of information about these subjects. As a suggestion, start with the NASA Quest Space Team Online site, at http://quest.nasa.gov/space. There, you can read about many of the men and women involved in the U.S. space program. You'll discover that you don't have to be an astronaut to enjoy and appreciate the wonders and mysteries of space.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 9 - 13:54:33 ]
RE: [Ben] What is the size of venus? Who discovered it?
Ben, try visiting the "planets" section on the Planetary Data System site. The site is underwritten by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and can be reached at http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov/planets. You can also reach the NASA JPL home page at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov. Good luck!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 11 - 13:55:07 ]
RE: [krista] how many moons does mercury have?
Krista, see my message to Ben just above.

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 13 - 09:00:06 ]
RE: [Katrin] I am not an astronaut,but iwant to be an astronaut.
Katrin, many people share your dream to become an astronaut. The NASA Johnson Space Center, in Houston Texas, has a site dedicated to NASA astronauts. To learn how you can become an astronaut, visit the NASA Astronaut Biographies page, at http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios. On this site, you can read about the men and women who have, are and will serve as members of the astronaut corps, and their accomplishments in their careers. We hope this information is helpful to you as you make your plans for the future. Best of luck!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 15 - 09:18:17 ]
RE: [Jason] Hi! My name is Jason Broadway. I want to talk to a theoretical physicist. I want to inquire on the meaning of imaginary mass. I want to know if it's related to charge or momenta. Please don't ignore me. Thanks! Jason Broadway
Jason, our NASA Quest Solar System Online (SSO) web site may be a good place for you to visit to learn more about imaginary mass. The site is available at http://quest.nasa.gov/sso, and includes: career and background information about many space science experts, as well as information about how you can chat with and e-mail questions to these experts. We encourage you to visit the SSO web site to learn more about the many investigations taking place in space science. Thank you for your question!

[ Oran/NASAChatHost - 17 - 08:10:50 ]
RE: [SONU] how old is the andromeda galaxy?
SONU, I don't have the answer to this off the top of my head. But I'm sure if you conducted an Internet search on the Andromeda galaxy, you would be able to find out how old it is. Give it a try!

 
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