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January 30, 2001 - Chat Archive

Farming in Space Data Analysis



[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 5 - 08:49:28 ]
Good Afternoon

[ ChatModerator - 6 - 08:54:45 ]
WELCOME to the 2nd FARMING IN SPACE chat! *TEACHERS* please give your school name, city, state, and any particular interest you and your students have in today's chat. To be added to our participant list, please email your name, school address, and phone number to issteam@cet.edu. *STUDENTS* please use only your first name or a teacher-approved nickname and no other identifying information. TODAY'S EXPERTS *GARY STUTTE* *BOB MORROW* and *TOM DRESCHEL* are researchers involved in studying plant growth in space. You can see their biographies by visiting the Featured Experts section at this web site: http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/ltc/farming/farming.html . Click on *REFRESH/SUBMIT* often to see new messages.

[ ChatModerator - 7 - 08:55:41 ]
In the *Farming in Space* activity, students have the opportunity to perform research working with four of the same model plants (AstroPlants, Basic Fast Plants, Super Dwarf Wheat, and Apogee Wheat) that NASA is using to study the potential use of plants to provide food, oxygen, and filtered water, and to remove carbon dioxide from the air in space stations and other forms of space habitations. The Farming in Space activity may be downloaded from the International Space Station Challenge web site: http://www.cotf.edu/iss/activities/farminspace.asp . Students are encouraged to design original experiments to provide information on how plants can help humans survive in space.

[ ChatModerator - 10 - 08:57:30 ]
Some schools have started the activity already, and others are still gathering materials. We're interested in finding out what stage your school is in. Please share your comments and questions.

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 11 - 08:59:08 ]
Hi: Tom is on-board.

[ Jo - 12 - 09:01:41 ]
Good afternoon Tom and Gary....my name is Jo. I'm a college freshman working on the Farming In Space plants

[ LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF - 13 - 09:01:41 ]
Greetings from Wheeling, West Virginia!

[ Jo - 14 - 09:02:08 ]
How is everyone doing?

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 15 - 09:02:38 ]
Jo: Are you working at CoTF?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 16 - 09:02:39 ]
Hi, Gary and Tom! We just finished 3 weeks of measurement data on the 4 plants in our lab. Our average heights were AstroPlant 175 mm, Basic Fast Plants 252 mm, Apogee Wheat 231 mm, Super Dwarf Wheat 179 mm. We are wondering if your results were at all similar in any of your preliminary ground tests?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 17 - 09:03:03 ]
RE: [Jo] How is everyone doing?
We are doing fine this afternoon. Howe are you doing with Farming in Space?

[ LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF - 18 - 09:03:24 ]
Hi Gary, Are you gearing up for the ground-based high fidelity test of the "Pesto Experiment" to be flown on the ISS? Is this still scheduled for March of this year?

[ Jo - 19 - 09:03:44 ]
I'm very excited to be a part of this experiment with all of you....

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 20 - 09:04:44 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Hi, Gary and Tom! We just finished 3 weeks of measurement data on the 4 plants in our lab. Our average heights were AstroPlant 175 mm, Basic Fast Plants 252 mm, Apogee Wheat 231 mm, Super Dwarf Wheat 179 mm. We are wondering if your results were at all similar in any of your preliminary ground tests?
If am most familiar with wheat, and those heights are about right. Apogee is generally 22 to 25 cm tall at 24 days and Super Dwarf from 18 to 22 cm at the same age.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 21 - 09:06:09 ]
Yes. I just returned from Crew Training in Houston last week, and we are planning on running the high fidelity test this spring. That dates have slipped a bit, but it will start in early April.

[ Jo - 22 - 09:06:52 ]
Yes Tom - I do work at COTF....everything with Farming in Space is going fine so far....

[ Jo - 23 - 09:07:52 ]
When we were making our PGUs, for a preliminary run, we used aluminum foil in one layer for the 'skirts'...but I've found that it rips too easily with one layer, so we have been working with 2 layers of foil to see if it would prevent ripping

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 24 - 09:08:13 ]
We are planning on harvesting our plants today and measuring wet masses of all the stem material. Then, we'll place them in a drying oven to determine percent water in the plants. What types of experiments will you do in your preliminary tests?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 25 - 09:10:28 ]
I obtain fresh mass, plant height, and leaf area for each plant, then dry the tissue to determine dry mass. After drying, I generally measure for starch and sugar content. I have collaborators who will be performing additional enzymatic and biochemical analysis of carbohydrate and photosynthetic pathways.

[ Jo - 26 - 09:10:59 ]
So far, I haven't noticed any tears in the foil, whereas during the trial run, I had already had to repair the skirts - so it may be beneficial to have a doubled-up layer of foil for the skirts instead of just one

[ ChatModerator - 27 - 09:11:41 ]
Reminder: *TEACHERS* please give your school name, city, state, and any particular interest you and your students have in today's chat. To be added to our participant list, please email your name, school address, and phone number to issteam@cet.edu. *STUDENTS* please use only your first name or a teacher-approved nickname and no other identifying information. TODAY'S EXPERTS *GARY STUTTE* *BOB MORROW* and *TOM DRESCHEL* are researchers involved in studying plant growth in space. You can see their biographies by visiting the Featured Experts section at this web site: http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/ltc/farming/farming.html . Click on *REFRESH/SUBMIT* often to see new messages.

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 28 - 09:12:00 ]
Do you have a special way of measuring leaf area other than tracing the leaves on graph paper and counting all the squares?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 29 - 09:14:36 ]
I use a Licor Leaf Area Meter to obtain that number. This is a relatively "high-tech" way of getting the data. Another technique is to photocopy the leaves, cut them out, and weigh the paper. You should create a standard curve using squares of the paper. It is important to use the same grade of paper for all plants.

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 30 - 09:16:00 ]
Tom, Are you aware of other schools participating in the Farming in Space experiment connected with Kennedy Space Center?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 31 - 09:17:00 ]
That's a good idea. Thanks, Gary! Do you use standard procedures for the starch and sugar tests on the leaves that you could share?

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 32 - 09:17:57 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Tom, Are you aware of other schools participating in the Farming in Space experiment connected with Kennedy Space Center?
Meri: No but we are in the process of developing a relationship with the USDA and Ag in the Classroom and there may be some very interesting possibilities there.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 33 - 09:19:33 ]
I can get those procedures to you. They're a bit too detailed to go into here. Generally, the sugars are extracted in alcohol, and the starch is then digested with enzymes I obtain from Sigma Chemical Company. After the extractions and digestions, colorometric assays are used.

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 34 - 09:19:35 ]
I was noticing that the plants (especially the Fast plants at 230-250 mm tall) outgrow our plant light house by day 21. Gary, would you happen to know the height of the Plant Growth Systems you use?

[ Greg - 35 - 09:20:57 ]
How are plants watered without gravity in space?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 36 - 09:20:57 ]
Thanks, Tom! We have heard from a school in Minnesota that was planning on starting up this week. We will start a new set of plants in front of our Lab Cam after today's chat.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 37 - 09:22:47 ]
The height of the plant chamber on the flight unit is about 18 cm. The plants reach the top of the chamber and bend over.

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 38 - 09:22:47 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Thanks, Tom! We have heard from a school in Minnesota that was planning on starting up this week. We will start a new set of plants in front of our Lab Cam after today's chat.
Meri: Will students be able to view your Lab Cam over the Internet?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 39 - 09:22:56 ]
Gary, I know this is a long shot, but is there any possibility of Farming in Space participants connecting to a Lab cam for your up-coming high fidelity test?

[ Jo - 40 - 09:23:49 ]
since there is no gravity in space, how would you get the fertilizer to stay where it needed to be?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 41 - 09:24:05 ]
In the BPS we water the plants through a subirrigation system. The media is held under a slight vacuum and we pump the water into the root zone to replace water used by the plants.

[ ChatModerator - 42 - 09:24:12 ]
Reminder: *TEACHERS* please give your school name, city, state, and any particular interest you and your students have in today's chat. To be added to our participant list, please email your name, school address, and phone number to issteam@cet.edu. *STUDENTS* please use only your first name or a teacher-approved nickname and no other identifying information. TODAY'S EXPERTS *GARY STUTTE* *BOB MORROW* and *TOM DRESCHEL* are researchers involved in studying plant growth in space. You can see their biographies by visiting the Featured Experts section at this web site: http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/ltc/farming/farming.html . Click on *REFRESH/SUBMIT* often to see new messages.

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 43 - 09:24:30 ]
Yes, our plants can be viewed today from our Farming in Space Activity page on our International Space Station Challenge web site: http://www.cotf.edu/iss/activities/farminspace.asp.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 44 - 09:25:27 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Gary, I know this is a long shot, but is there any possibility of Farming in Space participants connecting to a Lab cam for your up-coming high fidelity test?
There are certainly some logistical issues involved, but they can be investigated. It is probable that daily postings of pictures from the chambers can be made available.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 45 - 09:26:24 ]
The media and fertilizer are contained in a separate rooting module that prevents the fertilizer from floating out.

[ Greg - 46 - 09:26:44 ]
In our growth chambers, some of the roots have started to grow through the hole for the wick, does that affect their growth?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 47 - 09:27:25 ]
Gary can you taught a little about what you learned during your Nov.-Dec. 24-day test? Did anything go wrong or did anything unexpected happen, and how did you address it if it did (sorry, I know this is a LONG question).

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 48 - 09:28:01 ]
Not sure I understand the growth pattern. Are the roots growing out of the media, or are they staying in the root zone.

[ Jo - 49 - 09:29:16 ]
Is the lighting that we use going to be any different from the space station lighting? If so, how much do you think this would affect the plant growth?

[ Greg - 50 - 09:29:16 ]
Humans could not survive on these plants alone. What other plants is NASA working on to grow in space?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 51 - 09:29:16 ]
Greg, the same thing is happening in our lab. That always reassures me that the plants are getting the water and nutrients. Gary, does this every happen in space? I know there is no "up and down".

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 52 - 09:29:16 ]
RE: [Greg] In our growth chambers, some of the roots have started to grow through the hole for the wick, does that affect their growth?
Greg: That is normal. By the time the plants are mature, you will have a lot of root material in the bottom part of the bottle.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 53 - 09:32:12 ]
During the 24-day-test we were able to define the growth cycle of the plants, measure photosynthesis and measure transpiration. We also went through all the crew procedures and analyzed the gases. Your right, this is a long question. On thing we learned early was that the number of samples to measure transpiration was too ambitious. It took longer to reach a steady state than we had thought. We addressed this by stopping the initial test, reducing the number of points we were going to collect, and lengthening the measurement time.

[ LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF - 54 - 09:32:50 ]
Gary, Will the root material be included in the biomass analysis at the end of the Pesto Experiment?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 55 - 09:32:50 ]
Greg, how old are your plants? Did you plant all 4 types?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 56 - 09:34:00 ]
RE: [Jo] Is the lighting that we use going to be any different from the space station lighting? If so, how much do you think this would affect the plant growth?
The lighting system (cool white fluorescentlamps) is has the same light quality as that which will be used on ISS. The actual lamp design is different.

[ Greg - 57 - 09:34:32 ]
We are preparing to pollinate the Brassica Rapa and Astroplants, how do the Apogee and Superdwarf pollinate?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 58 - 09:34:32 ]
Thanks, Gary. How did you obtain the transpiration measurements?

[ Jo - 59 - 09:34:32 ]
Gary, since you lengthened the measuring time, exactly what did you change it to?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 60 - 09:35:31 ]
RE: [LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF] Gary, Will the root material be included in the biomass analysis at the end of the Pesto Experiment?
We will bring back the root modules to earth and harvest them. The roots attached to the living plants will be analyzed for enzymes to see if they experienced anarobic conditions. The roots from the harvested modules will be analyzed for root distribution and dry weight.

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 61 - 09:35:35 ]
RE: [Greg] Humans could not survive on these plants alone. What other plants is NASA working on to grow in space?
Greg: A partial list is: wheat rice soybean white potato sweetpotato peanut salad crops: lettuce, tomato, radish

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 62 - 09:36:04 ]
Greg, have you been measuring weekly plant heights? If so, we'd love to exchange data!

[ Greg - 63 - 09:36:04 ]
We planted all four types. I think we are on DAS 14.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 64 - 09:37:03 ]
RE: [Greg] We are preparing to pollinate the Brassica Rapa and Astroplants, how do the Apogee and Superdwarf pollinate?
Wheat is self-fertile. Unfortunately, we will not be able to grow wheat to full maturation onboard the ISS.

[ LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF - 65 - 09:37:25 ]
Thanks, Gary. This sounds like an area for more advanced classes to investigate also.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 66 - 09:38:12 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Thanks, Gary. How did you obtain the transpiration measurements?
We record the amount of water used by the plant during a given period. In the flight test, we generally use a period of 3 to 4 hours.

[ Greg - 67 - 09:38:15 ]
Yes, we have been measuring height. I will try to get the data.

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 68 - 09:38:15 ]
Greg, Day 14 was when we found our first flowers, as well. It is Day 21 for us and the AstroPlants and Fast Plants are still flowering.

[ Greg - 69 - 09:38:42 ]
Why can't the wheat be grown to full maturation?

[ Jo - 70 - 09:39:03 ]
Gary: is this because the wheat takes so long to mature?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 71 - 09:39:31 ]
Thanks, Gary! Now this is something we can measure (although we also have our fertilizer in our water)!

[ Chrisanthy/HomeEducator/LantanaFL - 72 - 09:40:01 ]
Will they use bee sticks or live bees in space to pollinate the plants?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 73 - 09:40:03 ]
In my ground experiments, I estimate transpiration by recording the amount of water I add back to the root module each day. I have a "blank" with no plants in it which gives me evaporation rates. By subtracting evaporation from the total water used, I get a good idea of transpiration.

[ Greg - 74 - 09:41:04 ]
Most of our Astroplants are around 100mm. The range is from about 50-170mm.

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 75 - 09:41:04 ]
Thanks, Greg. If anyone else has any plant height or other measurement data to share, please send it to us at issteam@cet.edu.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 76 - 09:41:16 ]
RE: [Greg] Why can't the wheat be grown to full maturation?
Not enough height in the growth chambers. This problem will be corrected in more advanced plant growth chambers being designed for ISS.

[ ChatModerator - 77 - 09:42:25 ]
Reminder: *TEACHERS* please give your school name, city, state, and any particular interest you and your students have in today's chat. To be added to our participant list, please email your name, school address, and phone number to issteam@cet.edu. *STUDENTS* please use only your first name or a teacher-approved nickname and no other identifying information. TODAY'S EXPERTS *GARY STUTTE* *BOB MORROW* and *TOM DRESCHEL* are researchers involved in studying plant growth in space. You can see their biographies by visiting the Featured Experts section at this web site: http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/ltc/farming/farming.html . Click on *REFRESH/SUBMIT* often to see new messages.

[ Greg - 78 - 09:42:46 ]
The Brassica rapa are mostly around 250mm.

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 79 - 09:42:46 ]
Gary, if we were to try the same method of transpiration estimate, do you think having fertilizer in the water would affect the results very much?

[ Jo - 80 - 09:43:03 ]
About the fertilizer - what type will be used in space? We use the Peters 20-20-20 here (1/8 strength) - I was wondering if the space station itself would be using something different....

[ LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF - 81 - 09:43:40 ]
[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 60 - 09:35:31 ] RE: [LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF] Gary, Will the root material be included in the biomass analysis at the end of the Pesto Experiment? We will bring back the root modules to earth and harvest them. The roots attached to the living plants will be analyzed for enzymes to see if they experienced anarobic conditions. The roots from the harvested modules will be analyzed for root distribution and dry weight. QUESTION: How will you document root distribution--By the number of branches and length?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 82 - 09:43:50 ]
Greg, our AstroPlant average heights were 33, 85, and 175 at days 7, 14, and 21 respectively.

[ Greg - 83 - 09:43:56 ]
Our Apogee is around 230mm. The Superdwarfs are about 205mm.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 84 - 09:45:07 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Gary, if we were to try the same method of transpiration estimate, do you think having fertilizer in the water would affect the results very much?
The addition of fertilizer should not affect the results much. In most of my non-PESTO experiments the fertilizer is in the water, and that is the method we use to calculate transpiration.

[ ChatModerator - 85 - 09:46:14 ]
RE: [Chrisanthy/HomeEducator/LantanaFL] Will they use bee sticks or live bees in space to pollinate the plants?
Welcome to the chat.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 86 - 09:46:30 ]
RE: [Jo] About the fertilizer - what type will be used in space? We use the Peters 20-20-20 here (1/8 strength) - I was wondering if the space station itself would be using something different....
A lot of different possibilities exist. I use Osmocote (a slow release fertilizer) mixed in with Turface (very similar to kitty litter) in the root module.

[ Greg - 87 - 09:47:25 ]
If there is no gravity, will the plants look any different, especially the roots?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 88 - 09:47:25 ]
Greg: Our weekly Fast Plant averages are 33, 170, and 252 mm. Our Apogee are: 115, 235, and 231 mm (guess our error is at least or - 4 mm). Our Super Dwarf wheat averages are: 88, 181, and 179 mm ( or - 4 mm)!

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 89 - 09:48:12 ]
Gary: Could you describe a little about the root module? It sounds like the biggest difference between the PESTO and Farming in Space setup.

[ Jo - 90 - 09:48:23 ]
Do you think the differing fertilizers would have much difference in the growth rates?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 91 - 09:49:06 ]
RE: [LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF] [ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 60 - 09:35:31 ] RE: [LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF] Gary, Will the root material be included in the biomass analysis at the end of the Pesto Experiment? We will bring back the root modules to earth and harvest them. The roots attached to the living plants will be analyzed for enzymes to see if they experienced anarobic conditions. The roots from the harvested modules will be analyzed for root distribution and dry weight. QUESTION: How will you document root distribution--By the number of branches and length?
We'll document distribution by looking at where the roots are distributed in the rooting media (evenly distributed, concentrated at top, etc.) and morphology (highly branched or no branching; thick vs. thin). We'll just have to see what they look like <g>.

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 92 - 09:49:46 ]
RE: [Greg] If there is no gravity, will the plants look any different, especially the roots?
Greg: In space, roots will take the path of least resistance and grow toward a more desirable environment (moisture, oxygen). Without the gravity cue, there is no "down" to grow toward but they will tend to try and stay out of the light.

[ Ann/Teacher/NorthCantonOH - 93 - 09:50:25 ]
Is it possible for us to get Osmocote? If not, is there a close alternative for us to use in the classroom? Or is the Peter's as close as we can get?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 94 - 09:51:18 ]
Since the plants will have a light "above" them, will the stems grow relatively straight in space? Can the roots use this cue?

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 95 - 09:52:17 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Gary: Could you describe a little about the root module? It sounds like the biggest difference between the PESTO and Farming in Space setup.
The BPS root module has about the same area as the farming in space module, but is smaller. It is only about 3 cm deep, and has three porous tubes delivering water to the media. The rooting module is packed with a rooting media (1-2 mm arcillite with Osmocote fertiler), which is then sealed in place with the root shoot barrier. The root shoot barrier has a thin layer of foam which holds the media in place, and has slits where the wicking material and seeds are placed. The roots then grow intot the media, where they recieve water and nutrients.

[ LaurieRuberg/NASACOTF - 96 - 09:52:30 ]
Glad you could join the chat, Ann. Have you started your plants yet?

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 97 - 09:52:30 ]
Osmacote is readily available. But matching the NASA root module system may be the greatest variable. How do you control the concentration of fertilizer, Gary?

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 98 - 09:52:49 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Since the plants will have a light "above" them, will the stems grow relatively straight in space? Can the roots use this cue?
Meri: As long as there is a "blue" component of the light, the plants will grow toward the light. The roots will tend to try and stay out of the light but if the aerial environment has a very high humidity, roots have been observed to grow out into it.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 99 - 09:53:56 ]
RE: [Ann/Teacher/NorthCantonOH] Is it possible for us to get Osmocote? If not, is there a close alternative for us to use in the classroom? Or is the Peter's as close as we can get?
You can purchase Osmocote at most hardware stores and garden centers (eg. Kmart, Walmart, Lowes, Home Depot) (No endorsement either expressed or implied).

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 100 - 09:55:19 ]
It is nearing the end of the chat. We received some photographs from Bob Morrow that we will have posted on our web site soon of the PESTO experiment apparatus. Thank you very much for all your helpful answers, Gary and Tom!

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 101 - 09:55:25 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] Osmacote is readily available. But matching the NASA root module system may be the greatest variable. How do you control the concentration of fertilizer, Gary?
The Osmocote is formulated to release the nutrients at a steady rate. We have performed numberous experiments to identify the concentration of Osmocote we use, and how long we can use it for.

[ GaryStutte/PESTOPrincipalInvestigator - 103 - 09:56:05 ]
Thanks. If was a pleasure to participate

[ TomDreschel/KSCDynamac - 104 - 09:56:13 ]
RE: [DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture] It is nearing the end of the chat. We received some photographs from Bob Morrow that we will have posted on our web site soon of the PESTO experiment apparatus. Thank you very much for all your helpful answers, Gary and Tom!
You're welcome. Very good questions!

[ ChatModerator - 105 - 09:57:49 ]
Reminder: *Teachers* please give your school name, city, state, and any particular interest you and your students have in today's chat. Do not include your student's names. Thanks.

[ Jo - 106 - 09:58:07 ]
Thank you everyone for participating - I've picked up some valuable information!

[ DrMeriCummings/ClassroomOfTheFuture - 107 - 09:58:07 ]
If any schools have data to share, please email us at issteam@cet.edu and visit our web site for additional Farming in Space information, as well as announcements about our up-coming chats: http://www.cotf.edu/iss/activities/farminspace.asp .

[ ChatModerator - 108 - 13:06:40 ]
If you are participating in the Farming in Space activity, please let us know by sending the following info to issteam@cet.edu: your school name, city, state, and country; the grade level of the participating students; and your planting date (or the day you plan on starting the activity). Thanks!

[ ChatModerator - 110 - 14:20:22 ]
The next chat will be on Tuesday, Feb. 27, from Noon to 1 pm EASTERN TIME (same as New York Time) featuring Johnson Space Center's BIO-Plex, where NASA is performing experiments on procedures and equipment designed for growing plants in space. Visit this web site for a preview: http://ADVLIFESUPPORT.JSC.NASA.GOV.

 
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